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Harlington Upper School

Design and Technology

 

Introduction to Faculty

On behalf of my colleagues I would like to welcome you to the Design and Technology Faculty.

The faculty encompasses a variety of disciplines all providing exciting opportunities for our students. This enables them to gain vital skills, knowledge and understanding that will not only equip them for forthcoming examinations but also life beyond the classroom.

We hope you will enjoy looking through the information provided but should you have any enquiries please feel free to contact me or arrange a meeting to speak to a member of the faculty who will be very happy to assist you.

Mrs J Beresford  Mrs C Martin
Design Technology Faculty Leader

 Subject Leader: Food/Textiles/Child Development

Curriculum Information

Subject

Product Design

Qualification

GCSE

Exam Board

AQA

Course Leader

J Beresford

Course Summary

Design and Technology: Product Design (4555)

The fundamental aim of the Product Design Course is to build on the work covered in Key Stage 3. Product Design has a practical approach. This encourages students to design and make graphic, electronic and resistant material products with creativity and originality. A variety of practical activities using a range of materials and techniques will be delivered throughout the course.

Units of work include: Design and Market Influences, Processes and Manufacture and Materials and Components. The theory content will be delivered through focussed theory lessons and embedded through practical activities.

Throughout year 10, students will have the opportunity to research, design, make, test and evaluate a range of products. The skills they gain will be vital and will provide a foundation to what is required for their Controlled Assessment in Year 11.

Students will be required to purchase a revision guide and workbook to support the theory content of the specification, plus an A3 carry folder and an A3 flip folder to present their Controlled Assessment.

What will students learn?

 

Year 9

 

 

 

USB Lamp Project

· CAD/CAM

· Isometric/Orthographic drawing

· Electronics

· Practical making skills

· Tech soft 2D Design

· Product Analysis

· Properties of materials

· Joining methods - Theory

· Health & Safety

What will students learn?

 

Year 10

 

USB Lamp Project and Design & Make – Skills Project

· Advantages of CAD/CAM

· Isometric/Orthographic drawing to enhance design ideas

· Electronics and components

· Practical making skills

· Tech soft 2D Design

· Product Analysis

· Smart materials/new materials

· Scale of production

· Properties of materials

· Joining methods –Practical

· Health & Safety

· Market pull & technological push

· Packaging

· Sustainability

· Human factors

What will students learn?

 

Year 11

 

Unit 2 – Design & Making Practice – Controlled Assessment Project

Plus

Preparation for Unit 1 - Theory Exam

· Advantages of CAD/CAM

· Isometric/Orthographic drawing to enhance design ideas

· Electronics and components

· Practical making skills

· Tech soft 2D Design

· Product Analysis

· Smart materials/new materials

· Scale of production

· Properties of materials

· Joining methods –Practical

· Health & Safety

· Market pull & technological push

· Packaging

· Sustainability

· Human factors

· Design movements

· Manufacturing

· Consumer protection

How will students be assessed?

 Year 9

Against the GCSE Product Design Criteria for mini GCSE projects

Against the mark scheme for practice exam questions

How will students be assessed?

Year 10

Against the GCSE Product Design Criteria for mini GCSE projects

Against the mark scheme for practice exam questions

How will students be assessed?

 

Year 11

Unit 1: Written Paper (45551)

40% of total marks 2 hours 120 marks. Candidates answer all questions in two sections. Pre-Release material issued plus

Unit 2: Design and Making Practice (45552)

60% of total marks Approximately 45 hours 90 marks. Consists of a single design and make activity selected from a range of board set tasks

Resources (e.g. useful links)

 

 

 

http://www.technologystudent.com/

AQA GCSE Design and Technology: Product Design

Product Design: Revision Guide (Collins GCSE Essentials)

Product Design: Revision Workbook (Collins GCSE Essentials)

Curriculum Information

Subject

Food Preparation and Nutrition

Qualification

GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition

Exam Board

AQA

Course Leader

Mrs C H Martin

Course Summary

The new Food Preparation and Nutrition GCSE will help you to develop a greater understanding of nutrition, food provenance and the working characteristics of food materials. You’ll also learn about food from around the world, through the study of British and international culinary traditions as well as developing an understanding of where food comes from (food provenance) and the challenges surrounding food security. You’ll master culinary skills and appreciate the science behind food and cooking. This is an exciting and creative course which will allow you to demonstrate your practical skills and make connections between theory and practice.

 

 

 

 

What will students learn?
 
Year 9

Food is a Life skill, it is very important that everybody knows how to cook food using raw ingredients, and the benefits of a Healthy Diet to our wellbeing.
We will aim to give you the knowledge, skills and confidence to be able to follow a range of recipes in practical lessons.  You will also be encouraged to apply this knowledge to other recipes that you make both at school and at home.
Alongside a range of practical skills you will be taught information about the importance of having a Healthy Diet.
 
Practical Skills that are included are:
Weighing and measuring accurately
Safe storage and cooking with high risk ingredients
Preparation of fruit and vegetables.
Rubbing in method
Rolling out dough and shaping a product
Glazing and finishing
Use of the oven, baking
Use of the hob, boiling and simmering
Whisking method used to make a Swiss Roll
Modifications and adaptations of recipes to suit preferences and dietary needs.

What will students learn?
 
Year 10

Nutrients
Nutritional needs and Health
Cooking of Food and Heat transfer
Food spoilage and contamination
Principles of food safety
Factors affecting food choice
British and international cuisines
Environmental impact and sustainability
Processing and production
Functional and chemical products of food
All of the above topics will be taught alongside associated practical work that will build up students’ confidence and practical skills working with food.

What will students learn?
 
Year 11

Introduction to Year 11 and Recap of Year 10
The second part of the assessment will be non-examination assessment and will consist of two tasks, involving practical work.

Task 1: Students will carry out an investigation into the scientific principles that underpin the preparation and cooking of food.

This task will provide you with an opportunity to demonstrate your knowledge and practically apply your understanding of the science behind cooking. You’ll practically investigate ingredients and explain how they work and why.

Task 2: Students will plan, prepare, cook and present a 3 course menu.

This task will provide you with an opportunity to cook up a storm and showcase your creativity and cooking skills. You might make a street food menu, create delicious tapas dishes or cook up a menu for a student on a budget.

How will students be assessed?

 

Year 9

 

 

 Baseline tests at the beginning and end of the module. Practical design and make assignment, which will involve research, planning out dishes to answer the task set, practical assessment and evaluation.

 

How will students be assessed?

 

Year 10

 

 

 

Regular homeworks set to check knowledge learned.

Half termly tests.

 

How will students be assessed?

 

Year 11

There will be one written exam for this qualification in the summer of year 11, which will assess your knowledge of the theory behind food preparation and nutrition. The exam will be 1 hour 45 minutes long.  (50% Qualification)

The second part of the assessment will be non-examination assessment and will consist of two tasks, involving practical work and supporting folder work.

(50% Qualification)

 

Resources (e.g. useful links)

 

 

 

 

www.aqa.org.uk/foodprep

www.FoodFactforLife.org.uk

www.nutrition.org.uk

www.bbc.co.uk/food/

www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/design/foodtech/

 

Curriculum Information

Subject

Child Development

Qualification

Cambridge Nationals Level 1/2 in Child Development

Exam Board

OCR

Course Leader

Mrs C.H.Martin

Course Summary

 

All students will study three mandatory topics as follows:

Health and well-being for child development

Understand the equipment and nutritional needs of children from birth to five years

Understand the development norms of a child from birth to five years.

 

 

What will students learn?

 

Year 10

 

The first topic of study underpins all of the other learning in this qualification. Students will develop the essential knowledge and understanding in child development, including :

·         reproduction,

·         parental responsibility,

·         antenatal care,

·         birth,

·         postnatal checks,

·         postnatal provision,

·         conditions for development,

·         childhood illnesses and child safety.

 

In the second topic of study, students will gain knowledge of the equipment needs of babies and young children and an understanding of the factors to be considered when choosing appropriate equipment to meet all of these needs. This topic will also cover nutrition and hygiene practices and students will be given the opportunity to investigate feeding solutions, comparing these to nutritional requirements and evaluating the outcomes. Evaluation skills are developed, which would be of use in further studies in a number of areas.Students will apply the theory from this section to complete CA 1.

What will students learn?

 

Year 11

 

The second topic will be finished during year 11.

 

In the third topic of study, students will gain an understanding of the development norms from birth to five years and the stages and benefits of play. Students will gain knowledge of, and skills in, developing activities to observe development norms in children up to the age of five.

The topic of the Child Study CA 2 will include researching, planning and carrying out activities with a child and observing and evaluating these activities, as well as comparing the child to the expected development norms.

Topic 1 will be revisited throughout year 11 to recap student’s knowledge, ready for the external examination.

There will be a mock examination at the end of the Autumn term.

 

How will students be assessed?

 

Year 10

Classroom and Homework tasks.

Regular half termly tests and mock exams to recap knowledge that has been taught.

 

Summer Term Carry out CA1: Understand the equipment and nutritional needs of children from birth to five years. Research Task

 

How will students be assessed?

 

Year 11

R018: Written paper

 Health and well-being for child development

OCR-set and marked 1 hour and 15 minutes – 80 marks

Learners answer all questions

2 Controlled Assessment Tasks

 

 

 

R019: Research task

Understand the equipment and nutritional needs of children from birth to five years

Centre assessed tasks

OCR moderated

Approx. 7-10 hours – 60 marks

 

R020: Child Study

Understand the development of a child from birth to five years

Centre assessed tasks

OCR moderated

Approx. 7-10 hours – 60 marks

There will be a mock examination at the end of the Autumn term of Year 11.

 

  

Resources

 

 

 

 

OCR Child Development for GCSE. Carolyn Meggitt. Hodder.

A textbook that comprehensively covers all of the Unit 1 content.

Supports: The whole of Unit 1      Cost: £20.99

 

Child Care and Development. Pamela Minett. Hodder.

A textbook that comprehensively covers all of the Unit 1 content.

Supports: The whole of Unit 1     Cost: £21.99

Websites

http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/pregnancy-and-baby/pages/planning-pregnancy.aspx

http://www.bupa.co.uk/health-information/directory

http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/clips/zsrg9j6

 

Curriculum Information

Subject

Fashion and Textiles

Qualification

GCSE Textile Technology

Exam Board

AQA

Course Leader

Mrs N Kemp

Course Summary

Textiles are all around us from the clothing we wear, to the wall hangings and cushions that adorn our homes. Smart and modern fabrics enhance our comfort and safety.

 

This course enables students to develop their design ideas and practical skills through the medium of textiles. Students will have the opportunity to explore both fashion and textile products.

 GCSE Design and Technology: Textiles Technology helps students develop their creativity.

This two-unit specification requires students to develop their ability to make textile/fashion products, a vital feature of candidates' experience of taking this specification.

This course has 60% controlled assessment as a reflection of the importance of practical work within the subject. The remaining 40% of the final grade comes from the written exam taken in Year 11. The exam paper includes a 34 mark design question that students prepare for, prior to the actual exam.

What will students learn?

 

Year 9

 

 

· Students will construct a technical folder that consists of decorative processes and construction techniques

· Students will have the opportunity to make a simple garment or textile product

What will students learn?

 

Year 10

 

 

· Work will include: the theory of Fibres and Fabrics, Enhancement of Fabrics, Fashion Illustration, Garment and Product Construction, Social, Moral and Environmental Issues, including sustainability.

 

· Students will undertake a wide variety of decorative and technical processes. Students will need to purchase their own fabric and components for their practical assessment in Year 10. This does not need to be costly and is determined by students’ individual designs.

What will students learn?

 

Year 11

 

Design and Technology is a practical subject area which requires the application of knowledge and understanding when developing ideas, planning, producing products and evaluating them. The distinction between Designing and Making is a convenient one to make, but in practice the two often merge. For example, research can involve not only investigating printed matter and people’s opinions, but also investigating e.g. proportions, adhesives, colour, structures and materials through practical work. The skills which follow underpin all learning and cover the programme of study for KS4 Design and Technology.

Designing Skills Candidates will be taught to:

• be creative and innovative when designing;

• design products to meet the needs of clients and consumers;

• understand the design principles of form, function and fitness for purpose;

• understand the role that designers and product developers have, and the impact and responsibility they have on and to society;

• analyse and evaluate existing products, including those from professional designers;

• develop and use design briefs and specifications for product development;

• consider the conflicting demands that moral, cultural, economic, and social values and needs can make in the planning and in the designing of products;

• consider environmental and sustainability issues in designing products;

• consider health and safety in all its aspects;

• anticipate and design for product maintenance where appropriate;

• design for manufacturing in quantity and to be aware of current commercial/industrial processes;

• generate design proposals against stated design criteria, and to modify their proposals in the light of on-going analysis, evaluation and product development;

• reflect critically when evaluating and modifying their design ideas and proposals in order to improve the products throughout inception and manufacture;

• use, where appropriate, a range of graphic techniques and ICT (including digital media), including CAD, to generate, develop, model and communicate design proposals;

• investigate and select appropriate materials and components;

• plan and organise activities which involve the use of materials and components when developing or manufacturing;

• devise and apply test procedures;

• check the quality of their work at critical/key points during development, and to indicate ways of modifying and improving it when necessary;

• communicate the design proposal in an appropriate manner;

• be flexible and adaptable when designing;

• test and evaluate the final design proposal against the design specification;

• evaluate the work of other designers to inform their own practice;

• the advantages of working collaboratively as a member of a design team;

• understand the need to protect design ideas. Making Skills Candidates should be taught to:

• select and use tools/equipment and processes to produce quality products;

• consider the solution to technical problems in the design and manufacture process;

• use tools and equipment safely with regard to themselves and others;

• work accurately and efficiently in terms of time, materials and components; • manufacture products applying quality control procedures;

• have knowledge of Computer Aided Manufacture (CAM) and to use as appropriate;

• ensure, through testing, modification and evaluation, that the quality of their products is suitable for intended users and devise modifications where necessary that would improve the outcome(s);

• the advantages of working as part of a team when designing and making products.

Students will develop a working knowledge of textiles materials and components appropriate to modelling, prototyping and manufacturing.

 Candidates will be taught to: Fibres and Fabrics Properties and characteristics • have a working knowledge of the basic composition, physical and aesthetic characteristics of a range of different fibres to include: natural fibres (cotton and wool), regenerated fibres (viscose), synthetic fibres (polyester and elastomeric);

• have a working knowledge of combination, construction and use of textiles fibres and fabrics;

• understand the need to combine fibres, to include polyester/cotton and combinations including elastomerics;

• investigate woven fabrics (plain weave, twill weave and satin weave), knitted fabrics and one non-woven fabric. Through disassembly investigate how they are constructed. Know that modern microfibres can be used to construct woven, knitted, laminated and micro-encapsulated ‘Smart’ fabrics;

• be aware of technological advances in textiles materials and their use in a wide range of industries;

• assess and evaluate the working properties of fibres and fabrics and how they can impact on fabric choices for products. Be aware of the use of manufacturers’ fabric specifications to select fabrics, and how manufacturing techniques and processes can influence fabric choices. Product maintenance, suitability and fitness for purpose

• know and design for the maintenance needs of textile products including typical/popular fabrics made from them and implement current textile labelling, including statutory legislation;

• understand the factors which constitute suitability/ fitness for purpose, i.e. wearability, warmth, comfort, absorbency, durability, after care, safety, flammability, stain resistance, aesthetic qualities. Finishing Processes Dyeing and printing

• have a knowledge and understanding of one basic commercial method and one hand method of dyeing and printing fabric. Decoration and enhancement • select and know how to use a variety of appropriate surface decorative techniques in order to improve the aesthetic qualities of textiles, fabrics and products.

 Finishes

• have a working knowledge of finishes (to include stain resistance, water resistance, flame retardancy, crease resistance) applied to fabrics in order to improve their performance; evaluate the effects of these fabric finishes paying attention to use, comfort, safety, maintenance, manufacturing costs and retail price;

• have knowledge of at least one modern ‘Smart’ finish to fabrics (to include thermochromatic printing);

• have knowledge of emerging technologies: nano materials and integrated electronics within textiles designs.

 Components Manufactured Components

• select, use and evaluate the function, suitability and safety of manufactured components in design and make tasks; identify and have a working knowledge of components including fastenings (to include zips, buttons and Velcro), threads, trimmings, interfacing, motifs, labels and electronic components; be aware of the technological advancements in component design.

 Unit 1: Written Paper 3 GCSE Design and Technology:

Design and market influences students will be taught how to analyse textile products and processes. They will consider how design and technology affects the manufacturer, user and environment, and the importance of health and safety issues. They will be aware of new developments in technology and current social issues that may influence product design. Students should be taught to:

 Product analysis Product Design

• understand the influence of trend forecasts when designing textiles products;

• analyse past and present textile designs and products in order to evaluate shape, style, aesthetics, choice of materials and components, construction techniques, decorative techniques, fitness for purpose, marketability; and use the findings of this research to generate new and original design ideas. Evaluation Techniques

• check of design proposals against design criteria;

• use disassembly to make critical judgements about the design, manufacture and performance of existing products;

• list design criteria that influence textile product design and use this to test and evaluate the final design proposal;

• understand the purpose and value of a design specification to guide design thinking;

• quality assurance through testing and evaluation of quality and fitness for purpose;

• use ongoing evaluation to make judgements and to suggest improvements during design development and making activities;

• consider other peoples’ views when selecting and refining product designs, to include user trials. Evaluation of quality of own product compared with market alternatives

• compare design proposal to a similar commercial product in order to review and modify design;

• evaluate the appeal, quality and fitness for purpose of the design proposal against consumer expectations. Social, Cultural, Moral, Health and Safety and Environment Issues Social and cultural influences on the consumer market

• understand the role of the designer and consider the impact of design proposals on society;

• identify developments in technologies, social and cultural ideas, fashion trends and economic factors that influence consumer choice and product design. Consumer choice and ethical issues

• understand the influence of ethical trading and the consumers’ role in social and environmentally sustainable design.

Moral and environmental issues

• understand the moral and environmental issues associated with textiles production;

• understand what is meant by the recycling of textiles, waste reduction, organic and Fair Trade cotton, bio fibres, biodegradable fibres/fabrics. Environmental effects: the disposal of chemicals used to manufacture products; the need to dispose of waste in a safe and environmentally friendly way Health and Safety issues

• understand that the health and safety of both consumers and the work force is important. As designers and consumers:

• select the appropriate materials and components;

• consider safety in terms of function;

• be aware of consumer rights and safety warnings on textile products. As manufacturers:

• be aware of and understand Risk Assessments in relation to:

• the correct and safe use of tools and equipment;

• the correct and safe usage of materials, chemicals, solvents, flammable and toxic substances used in textile manufacture;

• the need for correct protective clothing and safe working practices.

Processes and manufacture Candidates should be aware of, and use appropriate, manufacturing processes and techniques including CAD and CAM. They should be aware of industrial and commercial practice and know about the processes involved in the commercial manufacture of textile products. Candidates should be taught to:

Techniques And Processes

• select and use appropriate textile tools and equipment;

• know and understand how to use appropriate tools, machinery and equipment, including an overlocker, accurately and safely to produce own quality products. Range of processes used for textile production and manufacture

• understand the various industrial systems used to produce textile products, including mass, batch and one-off production and procedures including Just In Time, line and sub-assembly;

• select and use the most appropriate technique(s), process (es) and equipment for manufacture.

Production Planning:

Planning the development and manufacture of a product Candidates must know how to: produce plans to ensure efficient production and successful completion, to include —

• a flow chart to show logical and efficient sequences of work;

• a detailed working drawing;

• a manufacturing specification;

• costs of production, including the constraints of budget and time scale. Quality Assurance

• produce prototypes of own design(s) and test against the design and manufacturing specification and modify the product, where appropriate, to ensure that it meets the specifications;

• incorporate modifications as necessary during manufacture to ensure quality products.

Information and Communication Technology Computer Technology and Communication

• use ICT as appropriate to research, collect, sort and present information;

• use graphic techniques, as appropriate, including CAD and CAM to design, develop, modify, enhance, model and communicate ideas. Use of CAD and CAM

• know and understand the importance and benefits of using CAD/CAM in textile production in a global industry;

• know and understand that CAD/CAM can be used to aid planning, to enhance accuracy and efficiency of production and assure aesthetic quality;

• know and understand that CAD/CAM can be important in the reduction of manufacturing costs.

 Students will need to purchase their own fabric and components for their controlled assessment in Year 11. This does not need to be costly and is determined by students’ individual designs.

 

How will students be assessed?

 

Year 9

 

· Baseline tests at the beginning and the end of the module.

· Assessment of technical folder and product

· Exam style question

 

How will students be assessed?

 

Year 10

 

· Assessment of technical folder

· Assessment of Fibres and Fabrics unit of work

· Assessment of construction of product unit of work

· Regular homework set to check knowledge and understanding.

· Half termly assessments of exam style question.

· Year 10 mock exam in summer term

 

How will students be assessed?

 

Year 11

 

· Students will sit a written mock exam in November 2016 in preparation for the GCSE exam

 GCSE May 2017:

 

· Unit 1 Written Paper – 2 hours – 120 marks – 40% Candidates answer all questions in two sections Pre-release material issued for the design question

· Unit 2 Controlled Assessment – Approximately 45 hours – 90 marks – 60% Consists a single design and make activity selected from a range of board set tasks

Resources (e.g. useful links)

 

Aqa.org.uk for specification and past exam papers